Can You Trust God Like Gideon?

In Judges 7 we have the amazing story of God fighting for His people against the Midianites.  In this account we see God reducing the number of the Israelite army again and again.  Why does He do this?

For His Glory alone.

When victory is accomplished, do we recognize God as the source?  Can we trust God like Gideon did?

The Lord said to Gideon, “The people with you are too many for me to give the Midianites into their hand, lest Israel boast over me, saying, ‘My own hand has saved me.’  

Midian’s army was 130,000 strong.  Israel had 22,000.  God reduced it to 10,000 men, and then again to merely 300 men.

Take that in. 300 men vs 130,000.  The odds are staggering.

Look at this graphic to get a visual understanding of the sheer magnitude of this lopsided battle. (Click here to be able to zoom in.)

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You are NOT a Student First

For a few brief years you may hear this phrase by well meaning adults, “Remember… You are a student first”.

While the intention may be noble, the message is flawed.

Yes, students need to focus on their studies while in high school or college. They do not need to get the balance of social life, work, school and many other activities so out of whack that academic discipline takes a backseat.

But are you really a student “First”? Is there not a more important mission and goal of life even during the years in which you are a student? Is there a broader perspective that allows your identity to remain intact even beyond school and career decisions?

The answer is a resounding “YES”. Paul says to the Corinthian believers, “So whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God.” (1 Cor. 10:31)

Let this dominate our identity in all stages of our life, from student to career to family, to everything! This clip says it beautifully in 1:48 of your day, that will be well spent.  Watch it and be encouraged.

Saturdays with C.S. Lewis – Diminishing The Glory Of God?

Those Divine demands which sound to our natural ears most like those of a despot and least like those of a lover, in fact marshal us where we should want to go if we knew what we wanted. He demands our worship, our obedience, our prostration. Do we suppose that they can do Him any good, or fear, like the chorus in Milton, that human irreverence can bring about ‘His glory’s diminution’? A man can no more diminish God’s glory by refusing to worship Him than a lunatic can put out the sun by scribbling the word ‘darkness’ on the walls of his cell. But God wills our good, and our good is to love Him (with that responsive love proper to creatures) and to love Him we must know Him: and if we know Him, we shall in fact fall on our faces.

C.S. Lewis, The Problem of Pain (New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1996), pp. 46-47.